Inclusive Play Space Study

Child with walking frame in playground playing with musical play element and Grandmother on shared swing with grandson

Project background

Waverley Council is committed to providing equitable and inclusive play spaces in the Local Government Area (LGA). Council is undertaking an Inclusive Play Space Study to provide strategic direction on how we can provide inclusive play spaces where everyone can play - regardless of their age or ability.

The Inclusive Play Space Study will form a supporting document to Council’s Play Space Strategy 2014-2029 providing key guidance on access, inclusion and equity when Council plans and designs new play spaces. This study also explores exciting new concepts such as providing for intergenerational play, and we would love to know what you think.

We want to make sure everyone can play in our LGA!

Consultation Update

The first round of consultation for this project was held from 1 July to 30 September 2019. Thank you to everyone who filled out a survey, attended a meeting, or made a submission. To ensure the Study captured a broad cross-section of people, we invited 65 organisations who work, live with, or support people with disabilities to participate as well as inviting the broader community. This resulted in us hearing from 173 people directly consulted in 8 separate consultations.

Key findings of the consultation were:

1. The most visited play spaces in Waverley for people with a disability are Queens Park, Bondi Park, Bronte Park, and Waverley Park.

Reasons for selection included:

  • Proximity to home or school
  • Inclusive equipment and activities
  • Fenced with secure gates
  • Accessible paths and ramps
  • Spaciousness
  • Accessible parking
  • Playgrounds designed with Inclusive Principles (eg. areas to have time away from others if needed).

2. Feedback received provided clear guidance about types of play experience people would like in an inclusive play space, as follows:

  • Nature Play (natural materials and equipment)
  • Solo and Quiet Play (intimate spaces for watching others playing and having no prescribed program for play)
  • Sensory Play (natural materials and specialist equipment
  • Free Play Spaces (unencumbered grassed open areas)
  • Physical Play (different ways of being physically active)
  • Imaginative Play (an overall themed setting or a smaller whimsical item)
  • Social Play (activities that work best with a group of people)
  • Cognitive Play (intellectual challenges and puzzles)

In order for a play space to support a visit by people with disabilities, accessible supportive

features should include shade, fencing of play space, nearby parking, nearby toilets, picnic tables, accessible paths, drinking water and group seating.

To the right, the full consultation report is available to view, split into three parts – Executive Summary, Main Body, and Appendix.

Next Steps

Council will now use this Consultation Report to develop a draft Inclusive Play Space Study. We'll let you know when the Draft Report is ready for review and how you can provide further feedback on the Draft Study.

For project updates, subscribe via the 'Stay informed' tab.

Any questions? Please email openspace@waverley.nsw.gov.au

Project background

Waverley Council is committed to providing equitable and inclusive play spaces in the Local Government Area (LGA). Council is undertaking an Inclusive Play Space Study to provide strategic direction on how we can provide inclusive play spaces where everyone can play - regardless of their age or ability.

The Inclusive Play Space Study will form a supporting document to Council’s Play Space Strategy 2014-2029 providing key guidance on access, inclusion and equity when Council plans and designs new play spaces. This study also explores exciting new concepts such as providing for intergenerational play, and we would love to know what you think.

We want to make sure everyone can play in our LGA!

Consultation Update

The first round of consultation for this project was held from 1 July to 30 September 2019. Thank you to everyone who filled out a survey, attended a meeting, or made a submission. To ensure the Study captured a broad cross-section of people, we invited 65 organisations who work, live with, or support people with disabilities to participate as well as inviting the broader community. This resulted in us hearing from 173 people directly consulted in 8 separate consultations.

Key findings of the consultation were:

1. The most visited play spaces in Waverley for people with a disability are Queens Park, Bondi Park, Bronte Park, and Waverley Park.

Reasons for selection included:

  • Proximity to home or school
  • Inclusive equipment and activities
  • Fenced with secure gates
  • Accessible paths and ramps
  • Spaciousness
  • Accessible parking
  • Playgrounds designed with Inclusive Principles (eg. areas to have time away from others if needed).

2. Feedback received provided clear guidance about types of play experience people would like in an inclusive play space, as follows:

  • Nature Play (natural materials and equipment)
  • Solo and Quiet Play (intimate spaces for watching others playing and having no prescribed program for play)
  • Sensory Play (natural materials and specialist equipment
  • Free Play Spaces (unencumbered grassed open areas)
  • Physical Play (different ways of being physically active)
  • Imaginative Play (an overall themed setting or a smaller whimsical item)
  • Social Play (activities that work best with a group of people)
  • Cognitive Play (intellectual challenges and puzzles)

In order for a play space to support a visit by people with disabilities, accessible supportive

features should include shade, fencing of play space, nearby parking, nearby toilets, picnic tables, accessible paths, drinking water and group seating.

To the right, the full consultation report is available to view, split into three parts – Executive Summary, Main Body, and Appendix.

Next Steps

Council will now use this Consultation Report to develop a draft Inclusive Play Space Study. We'll let you know when the Draft Report is ready for review and how you can provide further feedback on the Draft Study.

For project updates, subscribe via the 'Stay informed' tab.

Any questions? Please email openspace@waverley.nsw.gov.au

  • Terms used in this Study

    5 months ago

    Inclusive Play Space:
    An Inclusive Play Space offers a robust recreational and social opportunities for the whole community. Inclusive play spaces provide recreational opportunity for all people regardless of differences in abilities, age, gender or culture. An inclusive play space accommodates everyone allowing them to be included in the play experience, play socially, choose from a range of activities and challenge themselves at their own development level. An inclusive play space can’t provide every experience for everyone but should provide something that everyone can access and enjoy.

    Accessible:
    Adjustments made to buildings, equipment and public spaces to ensure that people with a disability can access and use buildings and public spaces, as required by the Disability Discrimination Act and Australian Standards.

    Disability:
    A person with a disability is someone who is permanently physically, intellectually or neurologically injured or incapacitated and requires assistance of appropriate aids or services to move, communicate, or take care of themselves. Disabilities are often divided into ‘disability groups’ such as physical and mobility, learning and cognition, and vision or hearing.

    Special Needs:
    An individual with special needs is someone with a physical, intellectual or neurological impairment (as distinct from an incapacity) who may need help with movement, communication, self-care or decision making. For example, an elderly person may have impaired movement, vision or hearing that requires additional support to navigate a play space but would not be considered disabled. Or children with ADHD, mild to moderate autism, behavioural difficulties would not be considered disabled, and yet still have special needs to support their functionality in life, school and playgrounds.

    People with disability:
    People with disability living in and visiting our community have a range of different needs and abilities.
    It is widely recognised that the way people experience disability depends on the complex interactions between impairment and the environment in which they are undertaking activities.
    No two people experience disability in the same way. The kinds of barriers that people with disability may face that can prevent them from participating fully in community life include:
    • Physical barriers – such as uneven footpaths, steps into buildings, no accessible parking;
    • Systemic and operational barriers – such as when a person is unable to access or submit information;
    • Social attitudes – such as negative perceptions and attitudes towards people with a disability or older people.
    The implication for our community is that the physical, attitudinal, communication and social environment should change to enable people living with impairments to participate in society on an equal basis with others, and that this participation is a fundamental right of people with disability.

    Inclusive Play Space:
    An Inclusive Play Space offers a robust recreational and social opportunities for the whole community. Inclusive play spaces provide recreational opportunity for all people regardless of differences in abilities, age, gender or culture. An inclusive play space accommodates everyone allowing them to be included in the play experience, play socially, choose from a range of activities and challenge themselves at their own development level. An inclusive play space can’t provide every experience for everyone but should provide something that everyone can access and enjoy.

    Accessible:
    Adjustments made to buildings, equipment and public spaces to ensure that people with a disability can access and use buildings and public spaces, as required by the Disability Discrimination Act and Australian Standards.

    Disability:
    A person with a disability is someone who is permanently physically, intellectually or neurologically injured or incapacitated and requires assistance of appropriate aids or services to move, communicate, or take care of themselves. Disabilities are often divided into ‘disability groups’ such as physical and mobility, learning and cognition, and vision or hearing.

    Special Needs:
    An individual with special needs is someone with a physical, intellectual or neurological impairment (as distinct from an incapacity) who may need help with movement, communication, self-care or decision making. For example, an elderly person may have impaired movement, vision or hearing that requires additional support to navigate a play space but would not be considered disabled. Or children with ADHD, mild to moderate autism, behavioural difficulties would not be considered disabled, and yet still have special needs to support their functionality in life, school and playgrounds.

    People with disability:
    People with disability living in and visiting our community have a range of different needs and abilities.
    It is widely recognised that the way people experience disability depends on the complex interactions between impairment and the environment in which they are undertaking activities.
    No two people experience disability in the same way. The kinds of barriers that people with disability may face that can prevent them from participating fully in community life include:
    • Physical barriers – such as uneven footpaths, steps into buildings, no accessible parking;
    • Systemic and operational barriers – such as when a person is unable to access or submit information;
    • Social attitudes – such as negative perceptions and attitudes towards people with a disability or older people.
    The implication for our community is that the physical, attitudinal, communication and social environment should change to enable people living with impairments to participate in society on an equal basis with others, and that this participation is a fundamental right of people with disability.

  • Complete the survey

    17 days ago
    CLOSED: This consultation has concluded.

    Click here to complete the survey.

    It should only take around 10 minutes to complete.

    Survey extended and now closes Sunday 18 August 2019

    Click here to complete the survey.

    It should only take around 10 minutes to complete.

    Survey extended and now closes Sunday 18 August 2019