Inclusive Play Space Study

Consultation has concluded

Child with walking frame in playground playing with musical play element and Grandmother on shared swing with grandson

Project background

Waverley Council is committed to providing equitable and inclusive play spaces in the Local Government Area (LGA). Council is undertaking an Inclusive Play Space Study to provide strategic direction on how we can provide inclusive play spaces where everyone can play - regardless of their age or ability.

The Inclusive Play Space Study will form a supporting document to Council’s Play Space Strategy 2014-2029 providing key guidance on access, inclusion and equity when Council plans and designs new play spaces. This study also explores exciting new concepts such as providing for intergenerational play, and we would love to know what you think.

Feedback, based on your valuable experiences and insights will inform the study, providing better play opportunities for everyone.

We want to make sure everyone can play in our LGA!

Have your say

Consultation with the community is fundamental to the success of undertaking this study. We especially want to hear from:

  • Children and young people with a disability or special needs.
  • Adults with a disability or special needs.
  • Older people with a disability or special needs, including grandparents, that take their children or grandchildren to play spaces.
  • Anyone who cares for or supports children, young people, adults and older people with a disability or special needs that wants to access play spaces.
  • Organisations that support children, young people, adults and older people with a disability or special needs and their carers and families.

We would love to hear about your views, needs and experiences when visiting play spaces in the Waverley LGA.

Complete the survey

Round 1 consultation has now closed.

Next steps are to review everyone's feedback to incorporate into a Draft Study Report.

We'll let you know when the Draft Report is ready for review and how you can provide further feedback on the Draft Study.


Stay informed

For project updates, subscribe via the 'Stay informed' tab.

Project background

Waverley Council is committed to providing equitable and inclusive play spaces in the Local Government Area (LGA). Council is undertaking an Inclusive Play Space Study to provide strategic direction on how we can provide inclusive play spaces where everyone can play - regardless of their age or ability.

The Inclusive Play Space Study will form a supporting document to Council’s Play Space Strategy 2014-2029 providing key guidance on access, inclusion and equity when Council plans and designs new play spaces. This study also explores exciting new concepts such as providing for intergenerational play, and we would love to know what you think.

Feedback, based on your valuable experiences and insights will inform the study, providing better play opportunities for everyone.

We want to make sure everyone can play in our LGA!

Have your say

Consultation with the community is fundamental to the success of undertaking this study. We especially want to hear from:

  • Children and young people with a disability or special needs.
  • Adults with a disability or special needs.
  • Older people with a disability or special needs, including grandparents, that take their children or grandchildren to play spaces.
  • Anyone who cares for or supports children, young people, adults and older people with a disability or special needs that wants to access play spaces.
  • Organisations that support children, young people, adults and older people with a disability or special needs and their carers and families.

We would love to hear about your views, needs and experiences when visiting play spaces in the Waverley LGA.

Complete the survey

Round 1 consultation has now closed.

Next steps are to review everyone's feedback to incorporate into a Draft Study Report.

We'll let you know when the Draft Report is ready for review and how you can provide further feedback on the Draft Study.


Stay informed

For project updates, subscribe via the 'Stay informed' tab.

Consultation has concluded
  • Complete the survey

    2 months ago
    CLOSED: This consultation has concluded.

    Click here to complete the survey.

    It should only take around 10 minutes to complete.

    Survey extended and now closes Sunday 18 August 2019

    Click here to complete the survey.

    It should only take around 10 minutes to complete.

    Survey extended and now closes Sunday 18 August 2019

  • Terms used in this Study

    3 months ago

    Inclusive Play Space:
    An Inclusive Play Space offers a robust recreational and social opportunities for the whole community. Inclusive play spaces provide recreational opportunity for all people regardless of differences in abilities, age, gender or culture. An inclusive play space accommodates everyone allowing them to be included in the play experience, play socially, choose from a range of activities and challenge themselves at their own development level. An inclusive play space can’t provide every experience for everyone but should provide something that everyone can access and enjoy.

    Accessible:
    Adjustments made to buildings, equipment and public spaces to ensure that people with a disability can access and use buildings and public spaces, as required by the Disability Discrimination Act and Australian Standards.

    Disability:
    A person with a disability is someone who is permanently physically, intellectually or neurologically injured or incapacitated and requires assistance of appropriate aids or services to move, communicate, or take care of themselves. Disabilities are often divided into ‘disability groups’ such as physical and mobility, learning and cognition, and vision or hearing.

    Special Needs:
    An individual with special needs is someone with a physical, intellectual or neurological impairment (as distinct from an incapacity) who may need help with movement, communication, self-care or decision making. For example, an elderly person may have impaired movement, vision or hearing that requires additional support to navigate a play space but would not be considered disabled. Or children with ADHD, mild to moderate autism, behavioural difficulties would not be considered disabled, and yet still have special needs to support their functionality in life, school and playgrounds.

    People with disability:
    People with disability living in and visiting our community have a range of different needs and abilities.
    It is widely recognised that the way people experience disability depends on the complex interactions between impairment and the environment in which they are undertaking activities.
    No two people experience disability in the same way. The kinds of barriers that people with disability may face that can prevent them from participating fully in community life include:
    • Physical barriers – such as uneven footpaths, steps into buildings, no accessible parking;
    • Systemic and operational barriers – such as when a person is unable to access or submit information;
    • Social attitudes – such as negative perceptions and attitudes towards people with a disability or older people.
    The implication for our community is that the physical, attitudinal, communication and social environment should change to enable people living with impairments to participate in society on an equal basis with others, and that this participation is a fundamental right of people with disability.

    Inclusive Play Space:
    An Inclusive Play Space offers a robust recreational and social opportunities for the whole community. Inclusive play spaces provide recreational opportunity for all people regardless of differences in abilities, age, gender or culture. An inclusive play space accommodates everyone allowing them to be included in the play experience, play socially, choose from a range of activities and challenge themselves at their own development level. An inclusive play space can’t provide every experience for everyone but should provide something that everyone can access and enjoy.

    Accessible:
    Adjustments made to buildings, equipment and public spaces to ensure that people with a disability can access and use buildings and public spaces, as required by the Disability Discrimination Act and Australian Standards.

    Disability:
    A person with a disability is someone who is permanently physically, intellectually or neurologically injured or incapacitated and requires assistance of appropriate aids or services to move, communicate, or take care of themselves. Disabilities are often divided into ‘disability groups’ such as physical and mobility, learning and cognition, and vision or hearing.

    Special Needs:
    An individual with special needs is someone with a physical, intellectual or neurological impairment (as distinct from an incapacity) who may need help with movement, communication, self-care or decision making. For example, an elderly person may have impaired movement, vision or hearing that requires additional support to navigate a play space but would not be considered disabled. Or children with ADHD, mild to moderate autism, behavioural difficulties would not be considered disabled, and yet still have special needs to support their functionality in life, school and playgrounds.

    People with disability:
    People with disability living in and visiting our community have a range of different needs and abilities.
    It is widely recognised that the way people experience disability depends on the complex interactions between impairment and the environment in which they are undertaking activities.
    No two people experience disability in the same way. The kinds of barriers that people with disability may face that can prevent them from participating fully in community life include:
    • Physical barriers – such as uneven footpaths, steps into buildings, no accessible parking;
    • Systemic and operational barriers – such as when a person is unable to access or submit information;
    • Social attitudes – such as negative perceptions and attitudes towards people with a disability or older people.
    The implication for our community is that the physical, attitudinal, communication and social environment should change to enable people living with impairments to participate in society on an equal basis with others, and that this participation is a fundamental right of people with disability.